Home Tool Guide Electric Radiator Buying Guide

Electric Radiator Buying Guide

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Electric Radiator features

To make the best option for your electric radiator, you’ll need advice, tips, and product comparisons. We will assist you with inertia, storage, convector, or entry-level radiator. Also power ratings, gentle radiation, or convection heat. All is explained in this section.

Important characteristics

What is the formula for calculating the power of an electric radiator?

It would help determine the appropriate power before choosing the heating form or shape of your radiator. A power value enables you to customize a radiator to your specific needs. Watts (W) or Kilowatts (kW) are units of power, with 1000W equaling 1kW. The required energy for a particular area of floor in m2 is determined by multiplying the length and width of the space or by volume in m3 (multiply the floor area by the ceiling height).

Calculating the amount of power needed is vital for your comfort as well as your wallet.

In general, the amount of heating power needed is determined by several factors:

  • The winter conditions that your home is subjected to.
  • The insulation’s consistency.
  • The ideal temperature for the setting.
  • The amount of room that needs to be heated.

 

There are several methods for calculating:

 

  • For regular single-family dwellings, 100 W/m2 is assumed, 70 W/m2 for extremely well-insulated homes, and 60 W/m2 for heavily insulated or new-build houses.
  • Also, for bathrooms, assume 125W per m2.
  • Deduct 20% for rooms with a dividing wall and 5-10% for mainly sunny rooms.
  • For north-facing rooms or rooms with a lot of windows, add 5-10%.
  • While also taking the above measurements into account, add 10% per 500m of altitude (height above sea level).

In rooms more significant than 30 m2, regardless of the measurement method, it is often desirable to install two electric radiators for better heat diffusion. The majority of radiators are rated at 500, 1000, 1500W, and so on. Always go for the higher value that is closest to you. If you’re uncertain about the consistency of your insulation, it’s a good idea to hire a professional to test it. Your energy costs will be significantly reduced if your house is well insulated.

Radiators that are powered by electricity

What are the various types of electric radiators available?

Convectors, non-inertia, and inertia are the three types of heat distribution used in electric heaters.

Convectors

The transfer of heat through the circulation of gases is known as convectors. Convectors use electrical resistance to heat the air directly. When hot air rises, it is replaced by cold air, which is then heated. The passage of air diffuses the heat. As a result, the air is dry (or, more accurately, dried) and fluctuates in temperature, and the room’s circulation appears to collect dust.

Since they gain from a rapid temperature increase, convectors are ideal for hallways and well-insulated spaces. Adding a fan to speed up air circulation can intensify this effect. It’s a good idea to use an air humidifier to restore humidity after the convector has dried the air. The convector disrupts the ion balance (by suppressing anions), which is essential for our health.

Radiation heaters (also known as 'radiators') are a heater that emits heat through radiation

Radiating heaters emit infrared (IR) rays, which mimic the warmth of the sun. Radiation and convection are also used to distribute heat in these radiators. The heat all in the vicinity, including furniture, walls, and people, can be uncomfortable. Long-wave infrared rays are emitted by an aluminum plate heated by electrical resistance, while a halogen lamp produces short-wave rays.

The main drawback of all forms of heaters – radiators and convectors – is that they avoid paying heat once the current is turned off. The next logical step is to incorporate a system that can store heat and gradually release it. Here’s where inertia comes into play.

Heater

Blower radiators are similar to electric heater radiators or bathroom radiators in that they can quickly heat a small space. Blower radiators have a blower device that distributes heat produced by resistance. Ceramic heating elements can be used in specific blower radiators, resulting in better value for money. They typically have a timer and are splash-resistant.

used in conjunction with convectors or radiating panels to achieve a quicker temperature increase, beneficial in bathrooms.

Radiator with a high degree of inertia

Inertia radiators are the most cost-effective. A fluid inertia radiator stores the heat in a heat transfer fluid (glycol or oil). A dry inertia radiator stores the heat in a solid material (ceramic, steatite, or volcanic stone). An electrical resistor housed in the material’s hollow generates the electricity. Soft heat radiators and storage heaters are two types of inertial radiant heaters that are especially common.

Radiators with a gentle heat

A radiant façade heated by a first resistor and a core with inertia heated by a second resistor make up the soft heat radiators. The benefit is that thanks to their radiant façade (no more than 70 degrees), the heat radiators warm up quickly and, thanks to their inertial heating element, they replicate the heat.

While being electrically heated, soft heat radiators do not dry the air and have a temperature equivalent to central heating. The products of choice are cast iron and aluminum. The cast iron preserves heat well, while the aluminum heats up quickly.

Radiators with accumulators

Accumulator radiators are made from refractory (heat-resistant) materials. They have such a large storage capacity that they can store heat during the night (off-peak hours) and then radiate it the next day (peak hours), all without the need for a network link. Accumulator radiators work in the same way as inertia radiators in that they retain heat before restoring it; however, 

storage heaters have a larger storage capacity and hence more inertia. Their biggest flaw is their height and weight.

Radiators with a high degree of inertia

Radiation emitted by their heating center, either liquid (heat transfer fluid) or solid, restores gentle heat in inertia radiators (ceramic, steatite, or volcanic stone). Inertia radiators are less voluminous than storage heaters, but they operate for all electrical systems and cost-effectively. Inertia radiators, unlike soft heat radiators, do not have a rapid temperature increase.

storage heaters have a larger storage capacity and hence more inertia. Their biggest flaw is their height and weight.

Radiator with inertia: heat transfer fluid and heating heart

The temperature rise and heat restitution differ depending on the heating center of the inertia radiator.

Cooling agent

Heat transfer fluid inertia radiators are the most basic inertia radiators. The heat transfer fluid may be glycol, mineral oil, or vegetable oil, and the temperature rise is rapid. Heat transfer fluids with low inertia accumulate less heat than solid materials. Over time, leaks can occur. Fluid inertia radiators are movable models of oil bath radiators.

The material is ceramic

Heat transfer fluids have higher inertia than ceramics, but the temperature increase is more minor. It has a high restitution rate and can store a lot of heat.

Steatite

A metamorphic rock with a high calorific value, soapstone is a metamorphic rock with a high calorific value. Reconstituted steatite (steatite mixed with cement) should be avoided because it lacks the same properties as the softer steatite.

Smoldering

Cast iron is a carbon and iron alloy. Cast iron has excellent thermal restitution and a low-temperature increase since it is a heavy stone.

The lava stone

Lava stone is a volcanic rock with a high calorific value, as its name suggests. It has a high capacity for storing heat and restoring it for many hours. The best heat accumulation is found in lava stone, which is used in saunas worldwide.

Advantages and drawbacks of using an electric radiator
The Convector

Convectors are cheap, but they don’t heat the room evenly. The hot air current caused by convectors raises dust, making them unsuitable for people with dust allergies.

Radiating

The radiating panels’ infrared rays heat all within their range, resulting in less moisture on the walls and less heat transfer to humans. The heat is uniform and rapid, but there is no air stirring. There is a feeling of warmth and a rapid temperature increase. Radiant radiators should not be used in bathrooms with flat, white tiles or rooms with many glass, such as greenhouses or enclosed

The radiating panels’ infrared rays heat all within their range, resulting in less moisture on the walls and less heat transfer to humans. The heat is uniform and rapid, but there is no air stirring. There is a feeling of warmth and a rapid temperature increase. Radiant radiators should not be used in bathrooms with flat, white tiles or rooms with many glass, such as greenhouses or enclosed

Inertia

Inertia radiators have a slow temperature increase, but once the maximum energy is released, heat diffusion is constant and lasts for a long time, even after the radiator is switched off. The most cost-effective radiators are inertia radiators.

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